MMPA6465 Citizenship Through Marriage Policy Analysis


course by evaluating a public policy problem and making recommendations.
 
You will construct a Policy Analysis Paper. You will select and describe a decision-maker (at the local, state, national, or international level) who hypothetically has asked you to write a policy analysis on a public policy problem of your choice. You could choose a member of Congress, the president, a governor, a state legislator, a mayor, a city council member, or another official. Assume that the decision-maker is undecided about his or her position on the problem.
 
Your Final Project will be approximately 15–18 pages, double-spaced.
 
You will submit the Final Project in three parts:
 
Week 3: Public Policy Problem Selection. Submit to your Instructor a brief (1–2 pages) articulation of (a) what public policy problem you will analyze; (b) which decision-maker you will address your analysis paper to; and (c) why you believe this is an issue of local, state, national, or international importance.
 
Week 8: Final Project Abstract. Submit to your Instructor a 2- to 3-page outline of (a) 3 or 4 alternative ways to tackle the public policy problem you selected; (b) 10–12 scholarly resources that will inform and support your recommendations; and (c) your chosen recommendation to the decision-maker.
 
 
Professor, I choose a problem from my country. I will upload the work I did in weeks 3 and 8. My problem though is scholarly researches. But I was told that I do discuss an actual policy issue, and it is important. However, on sources, I am bit weak. It was suggested that I look carefully for academic sources that discuss citizenship/marriage policies internationally and this will help my paper. Make sure all the sources are used.
 
 
Week 10: Final Project (15–18 pages). Your Policy Analysis Paper should include the following:
 
Executive Summary: Describe the public policy problem of interest to you, the scope of the problem, and a capsule summary of your recommended course of action. (1–2 paragraphs)
 
Introduction and Problem Definition: Explain why the problem is important. Why should the decision-maker care about this issue? (1–2 pages)
 
Issue Analysis: Explain in detail, supported by scholarly resources, the scope of the public policy issue. You should describe the stakeholders (e.g., branches of government, interest groups, nonprofit organizations, media, the bureaucracy, etc.) connected to the problem. (3–4 pages)
 
Proposed Solutions: You are not expected to detail every possible approach to the issue you selected. However, based on your research, select 3 or 4 potential solutions that directly address the public policy problem you selected. It is important that you explain which stakeholders would be proponents and which would be opponents of each policy alternative you identify, and why, and the implications of their being for or against the alternative(s). You should make clear to the decision-maker the complexities involved with each proposed solution you analyze. (6–8 pages)
 
Policy Recommendation: Choose one of the alternatives to the public policy problem you selected and explain, based on scholarly materials you have examined, why it is best suited to address the problem. Be sure to address opportunities and challenges of implementing your recommendation given any relevant political, social, economic, or cultural considerations. Additionally, explain what, if any, social justice and/or ethical issues are impacted by your recommended policy alternative. (2–4 pages)
 
Some Required Readings
 
Anderson, J. E. (2015). Public policymaking: An introduction (8th ed.). Stamford, CT: Cengage Learning.
 
Chapter 1, “The Study of Public Policy” (pp. 1–36)
Chapter 2, “The Policy-Makers and Their Environment” (pp. 78–86)
Bardach, E., Patashnik, E. M. (2016). A practical guide for policy analysis: The eightfold path to more effective problem solving (5th ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: CQ Press.
 
Part I, “The Eightfold Path”
“Step One: Define the Problem” (pp. 1–12)
“Step Two: Assemble Some Evidence” (pp. 12-18)
Carlson, D. (2011). Trends and innovations in public policy analysis. Policy Studies Journal, 39(S1), 13–26.
 
Note: Retrieved from Walden Library databases.
 
Anderson, J. E. (2015). Public policymaking: An introduction (8th ed.). Stamford, CT: Cengage Learning.
 
Chapter 2, “The Policy-Makers and Their Environment” (pp. 61–72)
Chapter 3, “Policy Formation: Problems, Agendas, and Formulation” (pp. 87–89)
Bardach, E., Patashnik, E. M. (2016). A practical guide for policy analysis: The eightfold path to more effective problem solving (5th ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: CQ Press.
 
Part I, “The Eightfold Path”
“Step Three: Construct the Alternatives” (pp. 18-27)
Guess, G. M.,

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